Living in Poland

Living in Poland is something I will never forget. In total, I lived in Poland for just over ten years. I lived in three different cities, namely Warsaw, Krakow, and Opole. I thus spent most of my time in Opole in Southwestern Poland. I visited many other places including Czestochowa, Wroclaw, Zakopane, Nysa, Otmuchow, Wałbrzych, Warsaw, Swidnica, Karpacz, Jawor, Zgorzelec, Świeradów-Zdrój, Szklarska Poręba, Turawa, Kluczbork, and Wielun, etc. Here are some places I would recommend you visit, including the

  • Black Madonna of Częstochowa,
  • Zamek Czocha,
  • Zamek Książ,
  • Krakow old town, and Kazimierz,
  • Zakopane (visit it out of season so you don’t get bombarded with visitors and overblown prices)
  • Church of Peace in Świdnica (Kościół Pokoju w Świdnicy) and also the antique market held every first Sunday of the month, at the Old Town Market Square
  • Spa towns such as Świeradów-Zdrój, and Szczawno-Zdrój. They are truly wonderful
  • Szklarska Poręba, etc.

Living in Poland is a good choice if you want to earn a living teaching English. It is relatively easy to set up a company and the paperwork (invoices and contracts) is easy too. The other aspect which is very important is that Polish has what I would describe as a home culture which is perfect for teaching. Many Polish people like to be taught at home and/or are happy to learn English at your place. This makes setting up a company relatively easy. You probably won’t ever become a millionaire, but you will be free to live life the way you want and not have to put up with any unnecessary rubbish (OFSTED inspections, excessive lesson planning, etc.). When I was living in Poland (between 2007 and 2008 + 2011 to 2019), I had many clients who were happy to teach me everything I wanted to know (what foods to eat, which places to visit, how to write an invoice, how to create a contract, etc.) and when you do decide to close you business and move out f Poland, getting references is a breeeze.

Polish food is wonderful – especially the soups. Here are just a few I would recommend

  • SZCZAWIOWA – SORREL SOUP
  • KOPERKOWA – CREAMY DILL SOUP
  • GULASZOWA – GOULASH SOUP
  • BARSZCZ CZERWONY – CLASSIC POLISH BORSCHT
  • ŻUREK, ŻUR – SOUR RYE BREAD SOUP
  • JARZYNOWA – POLISH VEGETABLE SOUP
  • POMIDOROWA / “POMIDORÓWKA” – TOMATO SOUP WITH RICE
  • ZUPA GRZYBOWA – Mushroom soup (especially good if it is made with freshly picked forst mushrooms and Poles are experts at finding them)

There are otehr dishes I would recommend too, such as

  • Nalesniki – Pancakes
  • Placek po Wegiersku – Hungarian Style Potato Pancake
  • And any dish with Polish Wild boar in it!

If you get a chance, go and visit some of the more remote areas, such as the Polish highlands, etc. The Górale are an ethnically diverse group of mountain people inhabiting an area stretching west to east from the Ostrawica Valley in today’s Czech Republic to Poland’s Biały Czeremosz Valley. Meat is traditionally roasted, grilled, or cooked over a wood-stoked fire, and features pork as well as the two classic mountain meats, mutton, and lamb. Like other peasant cultures, soup plays a large part in the local diet. They dress in a folk style, like to dance, play music, and create a fabulous atmosphere when you go into old-style wooden restaurants, etc. For more information, please do contact me

 



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